My name is Ram Rachum, and I'm a Python software developer based in Israel.

This is my personal blog. I write about technology, Python, programming and a bunch of other things.

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28th February 2014

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Making order in chaos: The good way and the bad way

I’d like to share with you a lesson I’ve learned about the different ways that us humans create order in the world around us, and about which ways are good, and which are bad. I found this lesson to apply both to my professional life and my personal life; I’ve learned this lesson by taking a walk in the Givat Ram campus of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.

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8th February 2014

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I love Shpaml! (HTML abstraction language)

I’m in love with the Shpaml language!

It’s an HTML abstraction language. This means it’s a simple language that can be used instead of HTML in web apps, and is compiled to HTML before being sent to the user. 

The reason I love it so much is because it cuts down on a huge amount of code, and makes HTML feel a little bit more like Python.

For example, this snippet in Shpaml:

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11th January 2014

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Support Py2+3 in two separate codebases: How to do it and why it’s great

Lately there’s been a lot of discussion about whether Python 3 is working out or not, with many projects reluctant to move to Python 3, especially big, mature projects that are in the “if it’s not broken don’t touch it” phase.

I still fully believe in Python 3, but this blog post is not about discussing 2-vs-3; I’d like to make my own modest contribution to the Python 3 cause by sharing with you my method of supporting both Python 2 and Python 3 which I use in my open-source project python_toolbox.

When I originally read about the different ways to support both Python 2 and 3, I was appalled. There seemed to be 3 ways, and all 3 had properties that made me not want to even consider them.

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Tagged: pythonplanetpython

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23rd November 2013

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My take on free will

The problem of free will is considered a serious and profound philosophical conundrum. The crux of it seems to be this: On one hand, as we live our lives we feel that we have free will and that we can choose our own actions; but on the other hand, we know that a person is nothing more than a bunch of atoms that obey laws of physics, and therefore their behavior could be absolutely determined by physical analysis. The problem is clear: We feel that we can do whatever we want, but physics seem to be saying: We don’t have a choice in what we do, it’s all determined by physical laws. This seems like a contradiction.

Let me present my own take on the free will problem. My answer in one sentence: Every person has free will in certain points of view, but doesn’t have it in other points of view, so the whole problem where on one hand we seem to have free will but on the other hand we don’t can be traced to mixing points of view.

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